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Your Family Eye Care Center – Located in the plaza of Walgreens & JCPenney

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Home » Eye Library » Your Eyes and Vision » Reading and Vision

Reading and Vision

Good vision is vital to reading well. And although vision may not be the only cause of reading difficulties, it is one that is sometimes overlooked.


Eight vision skills needed to read
Reading requires the integration of eight different vision skills. Only one is checked by the typical school eye chart test. Quick eye examinations may cover only one or two. Since a comprehensive eye examination will cover the eight vision skills, it is a must for anyone having trouble reading. The eight skills include:


Visual acuity, or the ability to see objects clearly at a distance. Visual acuity is sometimes measured in a school vision screening. Normal visual acuity is referred to as 20/20 vision (or 6/6 vision in the metric system) — a measure of what can normally be seen at a distance of 20 feet, or six meters. If a problem is discovered in the screening, a thorough optometric examination should follow.


Visual fixation, or the ability to aim the eyes accurately. One type of fixation, called direct, has to do with the ability to focus on a stationary object or to read a line of print. The other type, called pursuit fixation, is the ability to follow a moving object with the eyes.


Accommodation, or the ability to adjust the focus of the eyes as the distance between the individual and the object changes. Children frequently use this skill in the classroom as they shift focus between books and blackboards.


Binocular fusion, or the brain’s ability to gather information received from each eye separately and form a single, unified image. Eyes must be precisely aligned or double vision (diplopia) may result. If it does, the brain often subconsciously suppresses or inhibits the vision in one eye to avoid confusion. That eye may then develop poorer visual acuity (amblyopia or lazy eye).


Stereopsis, a function of proper binocular fusion enhancing the perception of depth, or the relative distances of objects from the observer.


Convergence, or the ability to turn the two eyes toward each other to look at a close object. Any close work, such as deskwork, requires this vision skill. If convergence is poor then reading becomes uncomfortable after a relatively short period of time and double vision may result.


Field of vision, or the area over which vision is possible. It is important to be aware of objects on the periphery (left and right sides and up and down) as well as in the center of the field of vision.


Perception, the total process of receiving and recognizing visual stimuli. Form perception is the ability to organize and recognize visual images as specific shapes. A reader remembers the shapes of words, which are defined and recalled as reading skills are developed.


Treating reading-related vision problems
When a vision problem is diagnosed, the practitioner will prescribe glasses or contact lenses, vision therapy or both. Vision therapy involves an individualized program of training procedures designed to help develop or sharpen vision skills and possibly develop the eye muscles involved in focusing.


Because reading problems usually have multiple causes, treatment must often be multidisciplinary. Educators, psychologists, optometrists and other professionals often must work together to meet each person’s needs. The optometrist’s role is to help overcome any vision problems interfering with the ability to read. This may require the use of corrective spectacles and/or the implementation of a variety of eye exercises. Once any vision problems are addressed, the student is better prepared to respond to special reading education efforts.

In the wake of the latest recommendations from the Center for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, we wanted to make you aware of new procedures taking place at Maple Grove Vision Clinic, effective immediately.

HOURS OF OPERATION: We will be open Mondays – Thursdays from 12:00p-5:00p. If you currently have a scheduled appointment outside those hours, our staff will contact you to see how we can best meet your needs.

EMERGENCY VISION ISSUES: It’s extremely important not to neglect your vision needs during this time, so please don’t hesitate to call to schedule an appointment during the above hours in the event of injury, redness, discharge, possible infection, etc.

ROUTINE APPOINTMENTS: Currently, we are scheduling for routine exams for *after* April 6th. If you have a routine appointment already scheduled between now and April 6th, our staff will be contacting you to discuss your needs and how we can best meet them.

GLASSES OR CONTACTS (PREVIOUS ORDERS): You’ll get a call from our front desk (as always) when your glasses or contacts are ready for pickup, and you can stop in during our open hours (above) to pick up your orders. We can arrange free shipping as needed, although glasses are always best when we can fit them to you, in-person. Please call to discuss options.

NEED MORE CONTACTS? We need your business in order to stay in business, and we’re happy to re-fill orders for contacts and ship directly to your home for free.  Just call during our business hours to order or you can also go to our website www.maplegrovevisionclinic.com to order as well.

HOW TO REACH US: Call 763-420-8030 during business hours, or email us at drfrick@maplegrovevisionclinic.com

The health and safety of our patients has always been a top priority. As a reminder, here are the actions we take whenever a patient is in our office:

ONGOING SAFETY MEASURES:

NEW SAFETY MEASURES:

HOW YOU CAN HELP:

Please do not come in to our office if you’ve traveled out of the country in the last 14 days, have any symptoms of flu-like or respiratory illness, or have had known contact with anyone who has exhibited such symptoms or tested positive for the coronavirus. As noted above, we are happy to ship any orders directly to your home, or work with a family member to make sure your vision needs are being met.

We will continue to give (and follow) recommendations based on the evidence we have on safe delivery of eye care in a time of uncertainty.  We appreciate your continued support and understanding.

Sincerely,

Dr. Scott A. Frick and staff at MGVC

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Dear Patients- Our hours are changing during this two week period.

Starting Monday March 23rd we will have hours of 12-5 Monday through Thursday.

We are still closed March 20th, 27th and April 3rd. We will start back with regular business hours starting April 6th.