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Your Family Eye Care Center – Located in the plaza of Walgreens & JCPenney

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Myopia

If you can see objects nearby with no problem, but reading road signs or making out the writing on the board at school is more difficult, you may be near- or shortsighted.


This condition is known as myopia, a term that comes from a Greek word meaning “closed eyes.” Myopia is not a disease, nor does it mean that you have “bad eyes.” It simply refers to a variation in the shape of your eyeball. The degree of variation determines whether or not you will need corrective eyewear.


What causes nearsightedness?
Myopia most often occurs because the eyeball is too long, rather than the normal, more rounded shape. Another less frequent cause of myopia is that the cornea, the eye’s clear outer window, is too curved. There is some evidence that nearsightedness may also be caused by too much close vision work.


How does myopia affect sight?
Our ability to “see” starts when light enters the eye through the cornea. The shape of the cornea, lens and eyeball help bend (refract) light rays in such a manner that light is focused into a point precisely on the retina.


In contrast, if you are nearsighted, the light rays from a distant point are focused at a place in front of the retina. As the light will only be focused in that one place, by the time it reaches the retina it will have “defocused” again, forming a blurred image.


Myopia usually occurs between the ages of 8 to 12 years. Since the eyes continue to grow during childhood, nearsightedness almost always occurs before the age of 20. Often the degree of myopia increases as the body grows rapidly, then levels off in adulthood. During the years of rapid growth, frequent changes in prescription eyewear may be needed to maintain clear vision. It is important to bear in mind that the frequent changes in prescription are not making the eyes “weaker”. During the growth period that occurs during the teen years the eye is also growing rapidly and hence the degree of blur is also increasing. As the growth cycle slows the prescription changes slow correspondingly.


How is myopia diagnosed and treated?
Myopia is often suspected when a teacher notices a child squinting to see a blackboard or a child performs poorly during a routine eye screening. Further examination will reveal the degree of the problem.


A comprehensive eye examination will detect myopia. Periodic examinations should follow after myopia has been discovered to determine whether the condition is changing, and whether a change in prescriptive eyewear is needed. Eye exams also help to ensure that vision impairments do not interfere with daily activities.


Corrective concave (minus) lenses are prescribed to help focus light more precisely on the retina, where a clear image will be formed.


Depending on the degree of myopia, glasses or contact lenses may be needed all of the time for clear vision. If the degree of impairment is slight, corrective lenses may be needed only for activities that require distance vision, such as driving, watching TV or in sports requiring fine vision.


Nearsightedness in children:
School age children may have vision problems ranging from mild to severe. When problems are suspected, it is important that the child have a comprehensive eye health examination to determine the nature of the problem and to rule out serious eye diseases. When vision conditions are treated properly, the child will enjoy the best possible sight.


To help a child cope with nearsightedness:



  • Avoid referring to the child’s eyes as “bad eyes;” instead tell the child that his or her eyes just bend light differently and corrective lenses are needed to help focus light rays.
  • Ensure that they understand that nearsightedness rarely disappears and that wearing spectacles may be necessary in the long-term, but that this is not a disease.
  • Use illustrations and simple explanations to help the child understand how a differently-shaped eyeball may result in his or her being nearsighted.
  • Make the occasion of selecting new frames for lenses a fun time.
  • Consider contact lenses as an option.
  • Do not restrict the child’s activities because of poor vision.
  • Include the child in discussions about his or her eyesight. Encourage the child to verbalize concerns about the adjustment to rapidly changing vision.

In the wake of the latest recommendations from the Center for Disease Control and the World Health Organization, we wanted to make you aware of new procedures taking place at Maple Grove Vision Clinic, effective immediately.

HOURS OF OPERATION: We will be open Monday to Thursday 12PM -4PM and we will be closed on Fridays. If you currently have a scheduled appointment outside those hours, our staff will contact you to see how we can best meet your needs.

EMERGENCY VISION ISSUES: It’s extremely important not to neglect your vision needs during this time, so please don’t hesitate to call to schedule an appointment during the above hours in the event of injury, redness, discharge, possible infection, etc.

ROUTINE APPOINTMENTS: Currently, we are scheduling for routine exams for *after* April 6th. If you have a routine appointment already scheduled between now and April 6th, our staff will be contacting you to discuss your needs and how we can best meet them.

GLASSES OR CONTACTS (PREVIOUS ORDERS): You’ll get a call from our front desk (as always) when your glasses or contacts are ready for pickup, and you can stop in during our open hours (above) to pick up your orders. We can arrange free shipping as needed, although glasses are always best when we can fit them to you, in-person. Please call to discuss options.

NEED MORE CONTACTS? We need your business in order to stay in business, and we’re happy to re-fill orders for contacts and ship directly to your home for free.  Just call during our business hours to order or you can also go to our website www.maplegrovevisionclinic.com to order as well.

HOW TO REACH US: Call 763-420-8030 during business hours, or email us at drfrick@maplegrovevisionclinic.com

The health and safety of our patients has always been a top priority. As a reminder, here are the actions we take whenever a patient is in our office:

ONGOING SAFETY MEASURES:

NEW SAFETY MEASURES:

HOW YOU CAN HELP:

Please do not come in to our office if you’ve traveled out of the country in the last 14 days, have any symptoms of flu-like or respiratory illness, or have had known contact with anyone who has exhibited such symptoms or tested positive for the coronavirus. As noted above, we are happy to ship any orders directly to your home, or work with a family member to make sure your vision needs are being met.

We will continue to give (and follow) recommendations based on the evidence we have on safe delivery of eye care in a time of uncertainty.  We appreciate your continued support and understanding.

Sincerely,

Dr. Scott A. Frick and staff at MGVC

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Dear Patients- Our hours during this medical emergency are: Monday to Thursday 12PM -4PM and we will be closed on Fridays.

We are sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.